NASA is pumped towards 2023: Here’s why

NASA is pumped towards 2023: Here’s why
NASA is pumped towards 2023: Here’s why

It’s going to be tough for NASA to top 2022, a year marked by the first images from the James Webb Space Telescope, the successful completion of the Artemis I lunar mission and by hit an asteroid. So what’s the next step? A bloated NASA video released on Sunday previews all the space action coming in 2023.

The video features comments from NASA Administrator Bill Nelson, who kicks it off by saying, “We will never stop exploring the unknown in air and space.”

NASA has a busy list of activities for the coming year. NASA will announce the selection of astronauts for the Artemis II mission, the first crewed launch of its new era of lunar exploration. Expect a lot of fanfare around the reveal of prototype spacesuits for future Artemis missions.

This should be the year that Boeing finally launches astronauts to the International Space Station on its Starliner spacecraft as it seeks to catch up with SpaceX and its successful Crew Dragon travel streak.

Space rock fans can rejoice in the delivery of Bennu asteroid material as part of the Osiris-Rex mission. NASA also hopes to finally launch the Psyche mission delayed visit a metal-rich asteroid.

See NASA’s Daring Artemis I Moon mission in stunning images

View all photos

Perhaps less glamorous but equally important are a list of climate-related projects, including the launch of the TEMPO pollution monitoring satellite and the launch of NASA’s Earth Information Center project for sharing weather, land, water data. and climatic.

It’s not just space that will occupy NASA. The agency works on innovation X-59 supersonic aircraft and X-57 all-electric aircraft as means to improve air travel.

Expect new images and discoveries from Webb as a permanent theme throughout the year. Thanks to NASA’s busy schedule, there’s no shortage of reasons to look to the stars in 2023.

The article is in French

. NASA is pumped to here is why

. NASA pumped Heres

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