Meet Florida storm chaser, photographer Jack Miller

Meet Florida storm chaser, photographer Jack Miller
Meet Florida storm chaser, photographer Jack Miller

Meet Florida storm chaser, photographer Jack Miller

It takes patience and preparation to be a great photographer. Jack Miller, a photographer from Deltona, Florida, focuses on a specific subject: storm time-lapses.

DELTONA, Florida. It takes patience and preparation to be a great photographer. Jack Miller, a photographer from Deltona, Florida, focuses on a specific subject: storm time-lapses.

From rising thunderstorms, to threatening clouds, to the electric collisions of the sea breeze, his cameras have seen everything Florida has to offer. Miller’s love of hunting began eight years ago. His weather photography has now grown into a profitable business selling prints of his favorite weather photos. However, he jokes that it’s not an inexpensive business to start with.

“I thought I’d try and buy a $50 Kodak camera,” he said. “I had my first eclair and I’ve been broke ever since.”

Finding the perfect spot to capture the storms as they roll through central Florida is no easy task. It took him years to find the best places in the state.

“You start accumulating all those spots that you know are good positions for storms later in the afternoon, which saves a lot of driving time, preparations and also gas trying to find those spots to shoot from,” he said.

FOX 35 joined him on the road to see one such spot – near St. John’s River in Sanford. The treeless horizon provides an undisturbed place to record time-lapse video.

He said it usually takes him 700 to 800 photos, and about 45 minutes to an hour, for him to get ten seconds of useful content to make a time-lapse video. This necessary time is part of what makes planning your day so important, especially given the chaotic nature of Florida’s storms.

“If I have a good collision with a nice mature storm, I’m there for a good two to three hours. Then I fire 1,200 to 1,500 rounds just to get fifteen to twenty seconds usable,” he said.

His coverage of stormy Florida summer afternoons earned him international attention in 2017.

After spending six months compiling time-lapses of sea breeze storms, his film was recognized by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO).

“I got a response from WMO, United Nations, asking if they could go ahead and use it for their opening ceremony, which is an absolute honour,” he said. declared.

Moments like this remind him how powerful the images of the hunt can be.

“To come here and experience the storm and then be able to permanently capture it in a medium – whether it’s a time-lapse photograph or a print – it’s gratifying to be able to preserve that moment in the time you have could have witnessed that you might not come back,” he said.

. Meet Hunter Storms Florida Photographer Jack Miller

. Meet Florida storm chaser photographer Jack Miller

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